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5 movements to help high school athletes convert strength to speed

There’s a strong correlation between the strength that an athlete has and the speed that they can create on the field. For high school athletes, a balanced strength program should include lower body pushing and pulling movements and upper body pushing and pulling movements, as well as movements that strengthen the pillar. To convert these strength qualities into speed, we then use plyometrics.

Plyometrics are quick, powerful movements that rapidly lengthen and shorten muscles. While the primary goal is to improve the ability to transfer and apply force, plyometrics also help reduce injury risk. When coaching plyometrics, we need to consider how often, how much, and how intense an athlete should perform them. As a general guideline, ensure the athlete isn’t too tired after a warmup, and implement movements that are done successfully at high intensity with quality landings. Use plyometrics three to four times per week. Below are five sample plyometric movements to help train your athletes.

Squat Jump – Countermovement

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Rotational Jump – 90 Degree Countermovement to Stabilize

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Split Squat Jump – Alternating Continuous

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Lateral Bound – Countermovement to Stabilize

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45 Degree Bound – Quick and Stabilize

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